Wednesday, July 10, 2019

Welcome Wednesday!

Who joined Amver this week? Nine more vessels dedicated to saving lives at sea. There is no shortage of emergencies at sea and we're reminded of that almost every day. Thankfully, companies and vessels like those listed below work to ensure no call for help goes unanswered. Help us welcome the latest members of the Amver safety network.

  • DORTHE OLDENDORFF
  • MAERSK MC-KINNEY MOLLER
  • MORTEN MAERSK 
  • BOXER
  • FLEX CONSTELLATION
  • FRIEDRICH SCHULTE
  • EIGER EXPLORER
  • SEA WOLF
  • SEA EAGLE
Photo credit: Fotolia

Wednesday, July 3, 2019

Amver Oil Tanker Saves Swedish Sailor

A Swedish sailor was rescued from his sailboat after he lost all electronics and developed rudder and sail issues approximately 500 miles southeast of Nantucket on Sunday, May 23, 2019.

United States Coast Guard rescue authorities at the First District Rescue  Coordination Center received a distress alert for the 33-foot sailboat and request the Amver participating oil tanker Front Leopard divert and assist the sailor. A U.S. Coast Guard C-144 Ocean Sentry aircraft was also dispatched to the scene. The Captain of the Marshall Island flagged tanker reported "I can be on the scene in three hours."

The Front Leopard captain arrived at the distress location and emailed back to the Coast Guard, "There is no vessel in the distress position but we see a suspicious radar target drifting to our south at two knots. We also observed a red flare in the same position, approximately four miles away. We are altering course to that location and I have four lookouts posted and the powerful searchlight illuminated."

Shortly after that report the 823-foot tanker located the boat with the 63-year old sailor aboard. Despite 10-foot waves and 20 knot winds, the crew of the Front Leopard was able to safely rescue the sailor using the Jacobs Ladder. The sailor was in good health and remained aboard the Front Leopard until it arrived in Houston.

The Front Leopard, managed by Frontline Management of Bermuda, enrolled in Amver on April 12, 2016 and has earned four Amver awards for participation.

Video credit: U.S. Coast Guard

Welcome Wednesday!

Tomorrow in the United States we celebrate our independence. Every day we celebrate independence from fear with Amver. Your participation in the world's only voluntary search and rescue system should offer relief to those who go to sea. Your dedication to safety at sea knows no bounds. Thank you for continuing to support the Amver system and ensuring no call for help goes unanswered.

  • CAPT EMMETT
  • MARINA CARIBE
  • ENSEMBLE
  • VUOKSI MAERSK
  • NEW JOURNEY
  • TROPIC ISLAND
  • STREAM PACIFIC
  • SOUTHERN HAWK
  • RED NOVA
  • NISSOS DESPOTIKO
  • WILLOW
  • MURCIA MAERSK
  • VIKING JUPITER
  • CL RHINE RIVER
  • MARINA VICTORIA V
  • ESTEEM ASTRO
Photo credit: Fotolia

Wednesday, June 26, 2019

Welcome Wednesday!

Another week, another list of ships that have agreed to divert and assist in search and rescue. It's an extra measure of safety that's voluntary. Does it mean you may be delayed on a journey? Yes, but you recognize the delay means a life may be saved. There's value in that. It's the right thing to do. We're grateful for your steadfast dedication to safety at sea. Who joined Amver this week? Let's take a look.

  • ABIGAIL SUNRISE
  • MAERSK CAPE COAST
  • BERGE TOUBKAL
  • NS DREAM
  • MARLIN MAGNETIC
  • MAERSK ACHIEVER
  • CMA CGM FORT SAINT CHARLES
  • KHK MAJESTY
  • SAN FRANCISCA
  • KEM 1
  • MARAN GAS CHOS
  • FANFARE
Photo credit: Fotolia

Thursday, June 20, 2019

Amver Participating Oil Tanker Saves Four

The Amver participating oil tanker Torm Hilde rescued four people from a 45-foot sailboat with a broken rudder and low fuel approximately 400 miles southeast of Bermuda on Tuesday, May 14, 2019.

U.S. Coast Guard rescue personnel in Boston, working with their rescue colleagues at Rescue Coordination Center Bermuda, were alerted to the distress of the 45-foot sailboat Boingo Alive which was on a voyage from Antigua to the Azores when it suffered a rudder casualty. The crew of the Boingo Alive indicated they did not have enough fuel to reach their next port.

Coast Guard authorities, using the Amver system, were able to locate the Singapore flagged tanker and requested the captain divert to assist the sailboat. Captain Singh Mann agreed to divert and prepare for rescue operations. "We have altered course and increased to full speed to assist vessel in the distress position," captain Mann reported.

The 816-foot tanker made radio contact with the sailboat, determined they could not safely tow the sailboat and prepared to embark four of the six yachtsmen aboard the sailboat. The four were unhurt and remained aboard the tanker until it arrived in port in Gibraltar.

The Torm Hilde, managed by Torm Shipping of India, enrolled in Amver on March 26, 2019. This is the vessels first rescue.

Photo credit: marinetraffic.com


Friday, May 17, 2019

Amver Container Ship Rescues Solo Sailor

A lone sailor in a 60-foot double-masted sailboat experienced extreme weather and was rescued by the Amver participating container ship Cap Papatele approximately 1,095 miles east of Hilo, Hawaii on Sunday, April 11, 2019.

U.S. Coast Guard officials at the Fourteenth District command center received a phone call from a friend of the sailor. The friend reported he was worried about the sailor and the sailor was experiencing extremely severe weather and wanted to be rescued from his sailboat.

The Coast Guard queried the Amver system and contacted the container ship Cap Paptele. The captain of the Singapore-flagged ship agreed to divert and assist the sailor. "Good day, we are heading towards the last known position of the sailboat," the master of the Cap Papatele emailed to rescue authorities.

The sailor reported weather conditions were worsening and he did not know if he could survive another night on the boat. He donned his safety equipment, strobe light, and a life jacket as the Cap Papatele was able to maneuver alongside and, despite 25-knot winds and waves greater than 12 feet, successfully recovered the sailor.

The Cap Papatele disembarked the survivor in Long Beach, California. The Cap Papatele enrolled in Amver on February 21, 2011.

Photo credit: marinetraffic.com

Thursday, May 16, 2019

Amver Bulk Carrier Saves Four

The Amver participating bulk carrier Bulk Aries rescued four people from a sailboat adrift approximately 750 miles west of Acapulco, Mexico on Sunday, April 7, 2019.

The yachtsmen claimed they had been attacked by pirates and needed assistance. Their satellite phone company contacted U.S. Coast Guard rescue authorities to report the incident. The Coast Guard then queried the Amver system and located the 656-foot bulk carrier and asked the captain if he would divert his ship to assist the sailboat.

 The Spanish sailors reported they were attacked by pirates, were low on food and water and did not have an Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacon (EPIRB). They also reported they did not have life jackets or a life raft. The sailors were advised that the Bulk Aries agreed to divert and was on the way to rescue them.

The Bulk Aries arrived at the last known location of the sailboat and began making radio call outs and searching for the boat. The crew of the Singapore flagged ship was able to locate the boat and safely embark the four survivors. The yachtsmen were uninjured.

The Bulk Aries disembarked the survivors at their port call in Peru. The Bulk Aries enrolled in Amver on August 18, 2016.

Photo credit: marinetraffic.com